Marikana

cry wolf

The world is silent to my tears
Deaf to the plight of the voiceless
Blind to cries for help
When my voice loses its pitch
Decreases in volume
Drowned by the establishment
As I try to breathe
Gasp for a pint of air
Will you recognise my goat wails
My pleas for help from behind the veil of a choke hold
Should a strong uniformed arm over power me
Place my fragile neck in a vice grip
Will you document the proceedings
Just in case the surroundings decide to do me in
Should the most probable occur
Don’t look away
Place your recording on record
As my corpse is placed on trial
Castigated for my dress style
Persecuted because I wore a hoodie
Please highlight my side of the story
Or at the very least
Allow me to state my case in absentia
Tell ‘em I ain’t no thug
When the world ignores my cries
Trying to breath is no crime
Mistaken for resisting arrest
Tell ‘em I have ghetto mentality
I don’t do no fairy tales
I don’t play no cry wolf
I am dying

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remember africa

The architecture speaking volumes
Saying so much about a nation
Yet so little about the people
The way people live
Majestic palaces without kings
Homes without fathers

My country beautiful
Home to caverns of history
The galleries bearing testimony
Of kingdoms and civilisations
Merchants and scholars
Replaced with thieves and hustlers
People scarce
Foundations of society shaky
Products of upbringing found few and far between

My country on a dangerous path
The men too scared to lead
Children cheated of comfort
The way people live expressed by architecture
A distant memory on these shores
Everything a sale
Purchasing sectional titles
Partially owning our land
Whilst foreigners occupy the Cape
Brokers immersed in luxury in penthouses
Yet miners live in compounds, detached from family
Living like nomads on ancestral land

People live in villages
Rondavels replaced with complexes for individuals
The process of cultivating people displaced
Displaced by social engineering
Building houses for nuclear families
Extended family forgotten
Sitting on a time bomb

Foreign tendencies tampering with a legacy
The sense of community only a distant memory
Forgetting who we are
Failing to remember

Copyright © knox mahlaba 2009
Author of Back From The Dead: The Rising of an African Spirit

Inspired by a speech by Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe titled “Remember Africa”

Affirmative Action by Afrikaners

The only way of eradicating poverty and eliminating illiteracy in South Africa is by appointing an Afrikaner to be responsible for the implementation of Affirmative Action, Employment Equity, Broad Based Black Economic Empowerment and Land Reform.

The Afrikaner community is a shining example of the usefulness of preferential treatment as a tool in alleviating poverty and raising education standards among vulnerable sectors of our population.

The National Party excelled at implementing preferential treatment programs; and since there are remnants of it (National Party) in the ruling party it should not be a problem finding a suitable candidate for Cadre Deployment.

Jacob Zuma and the African family!

We are forever bombarded with images of absentee black fathers and yet you’ll never see images of strong, selfless, capable black men, who not only father their own children (on a daily basis) but the entire street or block, on mainstream media!

The media portrays black men as nomadic baby-makers but also castigates responsible black men who marry all their baby-mommies. 

Forgetting that ‘the system’ was designed to weaken the black family via the migrant labour system in South Africa (a system that exists to this day) and a welfare system that rewarded black females who pushed away their husbands in order to gain access to welfare cheques in the United States.

Though I strongly disapprove of Jacob Zuma being President of South Africa, he is a good example of a black man who takes responsibility for his children by marrying those he procreates with.

Africans must re-establish and fortify their family units and avoid defining ‘the family’ in narrow western terms. 

In an African family aunts and uncles are as important to the family unit as the biological parents.